Author: Sphere Editorial Board

Sphere Editorial Board: Right Wing Trolls on Campus Don’t Deserve Your Time

On Monday, the Stanford Daily reported that the Stanford College Republicans had submitted a grant application to bring right-wing political commentator and filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza to campus sometime in winter quarter. In that article, the Daily quoted sources from within the ASSU that indicated that SCR’s grant request would likely not be approved, though they could very well bring him anyway.

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Ten Must-Take Classes This Fall

Fall quarter presents students with a dazzling array of courses in the humanities and social sciences (and even STEM). Your trusty friends at the Sphere have come up with ten of the most appealing classes on offer, from transnational sexualities to the European scramble for Africa, and inequality in the ancient world. We at the Sphere wish you a fantastic new academic year.

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BREAKING: GOP distances self from Stanford College Republicans

The Stanford College Republicans’ (SCR) efforts to bring themselves in line with the national party have met with mixed results. In an email sent to SCR members, a freshman member of SCR suggested that there would be little overlap between the group’s “target audience” and attendees of Stanford Admit Weekend’s community-center welcome events—or, in the words of the SCR member responsible for the email, “race-based events” like the “Chinanx [sic] Community Welcome.” Our sources tell us that SCR’s new “targeting strategy” is just the first in a series of initiatives to make SCR look more like the GOP. Other initiatives in the works include tuition subsidies for high-income students and an expansion of the group’s on-campus ammunition dump.

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Announcing Cardinal Conversations

Universities across America are in a state of acute intellectual decay. Replacing a millenia-old tradition of discussion and debate, a stifling liberal consensus now dominates many campuses. Administrators often succumb to student pressure to disinvite unpopular speakers, while those few who do make it to campus are often shouted down or attacked. In response, some right-wing students have resorted to inviting speakers that are needlessly demagogic, making serious discussion even more difficult. Informed and civil debates are sadly rare on college campuses.

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